More Cold Weather Due Here

As, I would imagine, in most of the northern states.

A cold blast of winter heading into the US will arrive here early tomorrow morning with overnight temps the next few days in the twenties.

I know, many have it worse; much worse.

It’s supposed to be 80 today.

The wife is heading home now as I write this. BIL got his ass handed to him by the Mexican dentist, of whom he was so fond, and he came back late last night, allowing the wife to leave today, instead of tomorrow.

Good thing too as it would have been a slippery long drive for her tomorrow, as some icy conditions will hit Texas beginning in the morning.

My last purchase of birdseed yielded some type of bug thingy that infested my 30 gallon galvanized trash can, in which I kept the birdseed. They have been multiplying for months, and today I decided to dump the can, rinse it and sanitize it with some bleach to kill off all the bugs and eggs. Coupled with a few nights of hard freezes, that oughta do it…and what’s that SMELL?!

Next week I’ll get some more seed. I’ll need to put the bird feeders in the sanitizer too, as the bugs got into them as well.

I have a habit of instead of cutting up and tossing very large cardboard boxes, I flatten them and lay them in the carport. A habit I started when I actually had a garage.

With the cold fronts blowing in from the north, the carport is on the north side of the house and with the wife’s car gone, the cardboard ends up out and in the yard. So last front, I grabbed one of the landscape timbers I had laying about (that never used), and weighted down the flattened cardboard.

It’s likely a bit dangerous as when the cardboard gets wet, then dries, then gets wet, then dries, it tends to curl up, making traversing a wee bit hazardous for us old folks.

Today, I had to move all that stuff to accommodate the wife’s arrival.

Looks like no nap today either.

11 thoughts on “More Cold Weather Due Here

  1. I’ve found these in my chicken feed. If they’re what I’ve had, they’re called Darling Beetles.

    https://www.vetpoultry.com/blogs/barn-talk-livestock-health-and-nutrition/prevention-and-control-of-darkling-beetles-in-poultry-houses

    They breed like rabbits! That smell; you probably got some moisture in whatever you’re storing the seed in. It’s mold, which is a great place for the breeding of the beetles. I keep my chicken feed in galvanized trash cans too. Somehow water will get into them and ruin the feed. My solution; line the trashcan with a heavy duty trash bag. Pour the feed into that. If you go a while between fillings of the feeders, tie the top of the bag shut and lay it over inside the can so that if water drips onto it, it will drip off instead of funneling into the bag. If you’re into the feed every day or two, just fold the top of the bag down. When this last happened to me I lost three full cans of feed; about $80.00 worth.

    Another thing; once you’ve taken feed out of the can, don’t return it to the can, even if it’s only been in the feeder for a couple of hours. You’ll introduce bugs. I’m talking from experience. If you keep more than one can of feed, don’t dump the last scraps of one can into the full one. Same reason; bugs.

  2. With your humid climate, I suspect the use of metal trash cans may have resulted in condensation getting into the bird seed. The other commenter is likely spot on about the odor being from mold. As he suggested, use a good heavy duty trash bag, preferably oversize for the barrel, and keep it tied shut. Be sure to get as much air out of it as possible. You might want to keep a plastic bucket with a gamma seal lid as a buffer container that holds a 2 or 3 fillings depending on how often you fill the feeders.

    My biggest problem along those lines is with the squirrel food I buy. It is not unusual for it to already have weevils in it at the feed store. I have to inspect the bags closely before deciding which one to purchase.

    • Yeah; there’s something I forgot to mention; if you have the capacity to do so, put the bag of feed in the freezer for a few days before putting it in the can. This will kill off the bugs AND the eggs that are ALWAYS in grain products.

      I live in the Desert Southwest and even here, with the humidity of King Tutt’s tomb, moisture will find its way into those cans. The liners do two things; they keep moisture from getting to the feed, and, if a bag of feed has bugs, they keep the bugs confined to that one can. If you have multiple cans of feed as I do, this can save you big bucks! I only use the liner once, changing it when I refill the can. Invariably the scoop will puncture the liner at some point, rendering the liner a screen door on a submarine…

      If you find “THAT SMELL” in your feed, get rid of it. It can kill the birds, chickens, or whatever tries to eat it!

  3. I buy a 30 lb bag of bird feed as needed. I have a 5 gallon sealable bucket that I store it in, Near the bottom it has a air nipple. When I load a new bag I will hook my CO2 tank to the nipple and give it a couple of shots of CO2. Every other time we open it I will hit it with CO2. It kills any bugs or critters in the feed.

    We are bracing for another snowfall. The one over the weekend was right at freezing and it was wet snow that disappeared almost as soon as it came down after a 2″ accumulation. All I know is we are headed for more wintery mix.

  4. I had a similar problem with grain moths brought inside with a bag of black oil sunflower seeds a couple years ago. I finally found the last of the infestation inside of a coat I rarely use just a couple months ago. At least I hope it’s the last of it. Once the bugs got in, I had to throw out about 20 pounds of different shapes of pasta and 20 lbs of white and whole wheat flour and 50 lbs of dry Roman Beans. I remembered, finally, that Dad used to put Bay Leaf inside containers that had grain products in them, so I’m trying that this winter. Something about the smell of the Bay Leaf the bugs don’t like.

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